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Surprising Facts About Sickle Cell Anemia

Sickle cell anemia, also known as sickle cell disease, is a blood disorder caused by inherited abnormal hemoglobin, which then causes red blood cells to distort and become sickled cells. These sickled cells are quite fragile and thus are easy to rupture. Anemia sets in when these cells rupture and the number of red blood cells decrease. In addition to rupturing, sickled cells can block blood vessels, which can cause organ and tissue damage as well as pain.

Despite the seriousness of this condition, many individuals don’t know a lot about it. With this in mind, start reading to discover some surprising facts about sickle cell anemia now.

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One Of The Most Common Genetic Disorders

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Sickle cell anemia is one of the most common genetic disorders in the world today. Officials believe approximately 100,000 individuals are living with the condition in the United States, with another one thousand babies adding to this number each year. In contrast, the same officials indicate only fifty thousand people are living with cystic fibrosis. An estimate for the number of individuals affected worldwide is hard to pin down, but it is likely in the millions, particularly when other statistics are taken into account, such as one in 365 African-American babies and one in 16,300 Hispanic-American babies are born with the disease.

Continue reading to discover a surprising fact about the ethnic makeup of the individuals that sickle cell anemia can affect.

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Jessica Groom
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