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Causes And Risk Factors For Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

Viral Infection

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Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura can also occur following the aftermath of infectious agents in the body. This is most common in children ages two to six with an acute form of short-term idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Symptoms of this form typically last for less than six months, and many children who have had acute ITP have recovered without treatment.

The child might experience a little bit of bleeding, so monitoring is necessary. The doctor could also prescribe corticosteroids or give the child intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) or anti-D immune globulin. Children can develop acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura at least several days or weeks after the diagnosis of a viral infection. A child may be vulnerable to ITP if they have previously developed a condition such as hepatitis C, cytomegalovirus (CMV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), Epstein-Barr virus, parvovirus, influenza, rubella, rotavirus, chickenpox, varicella-zoster virus, measles, or mumps. Hepatitis A and B are also regarded as risk factors.

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