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How To Treat Hypovolemic Shock

Hypovolemic shock, otherwise known as hemorrhagic shock, is a condition in which the body loses a large amount of blood, causing low blood flow to organs, and as a result, these organs stop functioning. Symptoms of hypovolemic shock can be mild or severe. Victims may produce a tiny amount of urine. This effect may be accompanied by fatigue, dizziness, and sweating with mental distress. In some cases, patients wind up with cold, clammy skin. Several of the more severe symptoms are increased heart rate and difficulty breathing. Hypovolemic shock is a life-threatening condition, so the effects aren't to be taken lightly. Fortunately, there are ways you can treat the condition.

Control Or Stop Blood Loss

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Blood loss commonly happens due to a person experiencing injuries such as burns, cuts, and wounds. In addition, blood can be lost through complications from pregnancy as well as diarrhea and vomiting. Hypovolemic shock will be diagnosed when the patient has lost up to twenty percent or more of their blood supply. In cases of hypovolemic shock, the victim needs to control or stop blood loss. Blood is needed for transporting oxygen and nutrients to organs throughout the body. Losing too much can cause many problems, including the development of anemia, a disease that occurs when the loss of red blood cells exceeds red blood cell production.

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