How To Prevent CTE And Concussions

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a degenerating disease of the brain most common with military veterans, athletes, and individuals who experience frequent brain traumas. Tau proteins tend to form clumps in CTE, which slowly spreads all over one's brain thus killing healthy brain cells. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy can occur in young individuals as young as seventeen years old, though symptoms do not appear immediately until years after the occurrence of head collisions. In 1928, Dr. Harrison Martland described CTE as 'punch drunk syndrome,' which was mostly experienced by boxers.

On the other hand, concussions, which are also termed as mild traumatic brain injuries, are vicious shocks resulting from heavy blows on one's head, which ephemerally affects the functioning of the brain.

Recognize The Signs

Knowledge of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and concussions is essential in helping you avoid head injuries. Most young individuals might suffer from concussions and CTE due to minor bicycle accidents. It is essential for us to equip ourselves with the skills to recognize the signs of a concussion and chronic traumatic encephalopathy as well as ways of preventing these conditions for this reason. The symptoms depicted by most concussion patients are a loss of memory, head pain, blurred vision, and dizziness. Advanced cases of concussions result in CTE, which causes gradual brain deterioration over the years. It also creates the swelling and the enlargement of the other segments of the brain due to the spreading of tau protein clumps all over the mind.

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