Serious Symptoms Of Muscle Atrophy

Muscle atrophy is a condition in which an individual's muscle mass is decreased. In fact, the muscle may partially or completely waste away. Patients can develop this condition because of the aging process. It could also occur due to broken bones or spinal cord and nerve injuries. Burns, malnutrition, strokes, and long-term corticosteroid use place a patient at a higher risk for muscle atrophy as well. For some individuals, muscle atrophy may be a complication of an underlying medical condition, such as muscular dystrophy, neuropathy, polio, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Patients may be asked to have blood tests, x-rays, CT scans, nerve conduction studies, and electromyography to diagnose muscle atrophy. 

Thankfully, patients have options when it comes to treatment for muscle atrophy. Patients often receive physical therapy for muscle atrophy. Of course, muscle atrophy treatment varies depending on the underlying cause. When it is caused by malnutrition, doctors generally prescribe supplements for muscle atrophy. Muscle atrophy surgery may be suggested to correct the contracture deformities. The best treatment starts with understanding the symptoms. Learn about them now.

Reduced Muscle Mass

Reduced muscle mass is one of the most common symptoms that patients with muscle atrophy experience. Reductions in muscle mass contribute to limb weakness. Individuals with the condition may have one arm or leg noticeably smaller than the other. Doctors can perform a physical examination to check for reduced muscle mass. They will compare the size and strength of the muscles on one side of the body to the other. Suppose the reductions in muscle mass are caused by aging, inactivity, injury, or malnutrition. In that case, patients may be able to reverse the reduction by participating in physical therapy or starting an exercise program.

Keep reading for more information on the symptoms of muscle atrophy now.

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