Warning Signs Of An Acute Asthma Attack

An asthma attack causes a patient's airways to become inflamed and swollen. The condition, also referred to as asthma exacerbation, causes the airways to produce extra mucus while the surrounding muscles contract, leading to a constriction of the bronchial tubes. Asthma attacks tend to cause coughing, wheezing, and trouble with breathing. Minor asthma attacks can be treated at home and get better as long as the treatment is prompt. But if the attack is serious and doesn't respond to home treatment, it can become an emergency. To stop asthma attacks, it's important to learn how to recognize flareups early. This allows individuals to treat them before they cause a crisis. Patients should follow whatever treatment plan they have established with their doctor.

Get to know the major warning signs of an asthma attack now.

Chest Pain

Chest pain doesn't always occur during an acute asthma attack, but it's a common symptom usually accompanied by shortness of breath. The pain might be tightness or aching. Chest pain related to asthma occurs when the bronchial tubes have become particularly constricted and inflamed. The two main medical conditions that lead to post-attack chest pain are pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. The area between the heart and lungs is called the mediastinum, and pneumomediastinum is the name for air entering this area. It can lead to increased lung pressure and pain. In addition to radiating pain, patients might experience difficulty swallowing, coughing, coughing up mucus, and shortness of breath. Pneumothorax, on the other hand, is extremely serious. This term refers to air that has leaked into the space between the chest wall and lungs due to a lung collapse. If individuals experience wheezing, respiratory distress, racing heart rate, fast breathing, and agitation following an asthma attack, they should seek emergency medical attention, as untreated pneumothorax can be deadly.

Learn about more indicators of an acute asthma attack now.

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