Guide To The Symptoms Of Diabetes In Children

Diabetes mellitus is a condition that occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin, which is required to turn sugar into an energy form usable by cells. Without insulin, sugar remains in the bloodstream. High blood sugar can have dangerous complications, and in the worst-case scenarios, diabetes can be fatal. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is key to preventing permanent damage. Type 1 diabetes occurs when a child's body doesn't produce insulin anymore, and the insulin must be replaced through medications since it's necessary for survival. Type 2 diabetes is less common in children, and it occurs when the body doesn't produce adequate insulin. Type 2 diabetes can sometimes be reversed, and it can often be controlled through diet and exercise. However, when diet and exercise aren't enough, medication might be necessary to help manage blood sugar.

Get to know the major symptoms of diabetes seen in children now.

Increased Urination And Thirst

When sugar builds up to toxic levels in the bloodstream, it removes fluid from the tissues of the child's body, causing the tissues to become dehydrated because of their lower fluid content. As a result, children might experience much greater thirst than they usually do. And since they will typically increase the amount of liquid they're drinking to compensate, their urination habits may change as well. Children may need to urinate more frequently, to the point it might be disruptive to their learning, extracurricular activities, or comfort at home. Type 2 diabetes is unlikely to develop in very young children, but type 1 may develop. If the child is young and has recently been toilet trained, they might suddenly start wetting the bed or having accidents again. Occasional bed wetting is normal for young children, but if it happens with unusual frequency, or it starts when the child previously didn't have a problem, parents should talk to their child's pediatrician.

Learn more about the signs of diabetes in children now.

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Katherine MacAulay
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