How To Have A Healthy Diet High In Protein

Protein is a key macronutrient composed of amino acids. Found in every cell in the human body, it helps in building muscle, repairing damaged tissue, and regulating the metabolism. Approximately forty-three percent of the body's protein is found in skeletal muscles, and fifteen percent is located in the blood. Another fifteen percent is found in the skin, and the remainder is reserved for use by other parts of the body, including enzymes and hormones. Currently, the recommended daily intake of protein varies according to gender, age, and weight. For adult men and women aged nineteen and above, the recommended daily intake of complete protein (protein that provides all essential amino acids) is 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight (seven grams for every twenty pounds of body weight). Thus, an individual who weighs 140 pounds would need roughly fifty grams of complete protein each day, and someone weighing two hundred pounds would need around seventy grams.

Health officials recommend obtaining as much protein as possible from natural food sources. Nutritionists often advise patients looking to increase their protein intake to adopt some of the healthy habits outlined below.

Avoid Processed Meats

Several recent studies suggest processed meat is linked to an increased risk of both cancer and cardiovascular disease. For this reason, leading health organizations now advocate for everyone to avoid processed meats as much as possible. Processed meats such as salami, bacon, hot dogs, and luncheon meats contain very high levels of nitrates, an ingredient some studies have classified as carcinogenic. The high sodium content of processed meats could also lead to high blood pressure, a major risk factor for stroke and cardiovascular disease. Many types of processed meats, including bacon, contain high levels of saturated fat, another ingredient known to increase cholesterol readings and contribute to obesity.

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