Methods Of Treating Mitral Valve Prolapse

The mitral valve is the bicuspid valve that separates the left ventricle from the left atrium of the heart. The sound of its flaps closing is part of the 'lub' in the traditional 'lub dub' rendering of a heartbeat. When it functions correctly, this valve allows oxygen-rich blood to flow from ventricle to atrium, where it is pumped out into the rest of the body. Due to genetics or other conditions, the flaps of the valve can fall back into the left atrium, a condition known as mitral valve prolapse. While this condition is rarely life-threatening and often asymptomatic, more severe cases can lead to blood back-flowing into the atrium, a condition known as mitral valve regurgitation. When mitral valve prolapse becomes more serious, there are several treatment options. Learn about them now.

Beta Blockers

The medications prescribed for mitral valve prolapse are administered to lower the risk of other complications that can arise from the condition, such as an irregular heartbeat or clotting. Beta blockers are used to prevent arrhythmias by slowing the heart rate and reducing the force of heart contractions. These medications also relax blood vessels throughout the body, which improves blood flow. Blood pressure lowers, and the risk of irregular heartbeat declines. However, it should be noted such medications do not remove the underlying condition, and the flaps of the valve remain in prolapse, even when these medications are administered.

Reveal more methods of treating mitral valve prolapse now.

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