Guide To The Risk Factors, Causes, And Complications Of Aortic Stenosis

Aging

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A common and often overlooked factor that increases an individual's risk of developing aortic valve stenosis is the natural processes that occur due to aging. Older adults are more likely to have high blood pressure and cholesterol that can cause the valve to become inflamed and or damaged. They are also more likely to have reduced kidney function that may cause a mild or moderate elevation of certain substances in their blood. This malfunction occurs when the kidneys cannot clear these substances from the body as effectively as they once could. 

When calcium levels are elevated in the blood due to declining kidney function, the patient is more likely to experience the disposition of calcium in their tissues. Calcium deposits in the tissues that make up the aortic valve can cause the patient to develop aortic valve stenosis. Older individuals are also more likely to have other heart problems that can damage the aortic valve. Examples include extensive scar tissue, pericarditis, cardiac muscle ischemia, and blood clots.

Get more information regarding the causes and risk factors related to aortic stenosis now.

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