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How To Help Someone Having An Anxiety Or Panic Attack

Anxiety and panic attacks are physical manifestations of an anxiety disorder, including generalized anxiety disorder. An individual can experience anxiety or panic attacks in a variety of different situations. When individuals have a panic or anxiety disorder, they have a higher chance of experiencing unprompted panic attacks. Someone having an anxiety attack may have an elevated heartbeat, rapid breathing, and increased stress. Panic attacks tend to last for ten minutes at the most, though they typically have much sharper symptoms than anxiety attacks. An individual having a panic attack may experience pressure or squeezing on their chest, difficulty breathing, a rapid heartbeat, and intense fear.

Thankfully, patients have many anxiety and panic attacks treatment options. Many individuals try a medication for panic attacks to help calm their symptoms. There are also some other options, so some patients look into a homeopathic remedy for panic attacks. However, it may also be helpful for other individuals to know how to help someone having an anxiety or panic attack. In fact, knowing how to help can be the first step in finding the best treatment for panic attacks.

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Ask Them If They Are Having One

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The first thing most people can do to help someone having a panic or anxiety attack is quite simple: ask them if they are having one. This question lets you know if the individual has had a panic attack before. If they have, you can then ask them if they would like you to help or if there is anything that you can do for them. However, sometimes this may be the patient's first anxiety or panic attack. In this case, they may find it even more terrifying, since they may not immediately know what is happening. Asking them if they are having a panic attack can help get the thought into their mind. However, it is vital for you to remain calm and still ask if you can offer them help.

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Katherine MacAulay
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