What Is Antisocial Personality Disorder?

People suffering from antisocial personality disorder can live a much more meaningful life by learning which medications and therapies to use and where to find them.

Personality disorders are disorders that are deep-seated and intractable. They cause problems with work and relationships. Antisocial personality disorder (APD) is a condition where an individual shows no respect for the rights of others, and violate them frequently. Individuals with APD tend to antagonize, manipulate, or harm others. They are often described as being 'without a conscience.' They often lose jobs, do poorly in school, abuse substances, and get arrested. Adults with antisocial personality disorder typically show signs from an early age; one of the diagnostic criteria is they've shown symptoms since fifteen years old. It's not called APD that young, because it is possible a behaviorally challenged child or adolescent will learn and change; kids showing this disregard for the rights of others are usually diagnosed with conduct disorder. But by the time they're in their later teens (the minimum age for an individual to be officially diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder is eighteen), the pattern is set; personality disorders are extremely difficult to change. Reveal the warning signs and dive into precisely what antisocial personality disorder is now.

Deceitful And Frequently Lies

A person with antisocial personality disorder is often untruthful. Being deceitful and telling lies are early hallmarks of APD. These individuals want what they want, and will say whatever is needed to get that. They will use lying, aliases, and other forms of deceit for pleasure or personal profit. They'll lie to get jobs, sex, money, or possessions. They typically have no problem with stealing or committing fraud if they want something. Individuals with antisocial personality disorder have difficulty reasoning cause and effect when it comes to others, and will often not see why being deceitful makes others mistrust them, or be unwilling to do what they want. If someone gets upset at being deceived, they'll lie about what happened, or just blame it all on their victim, often saying they shouldn't have fallen for it.

Learn more about what antisocial personality disorder is by reading more now.

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