Risk Factors And Complications Linked To Morphea

Impaired Movement

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Morphea doesn't involve the internal organs, but it can involve muscles, bones, and joints. When the condition affects an individual's legs or arms, it might impair their joint mobility. Plaque morphea, the most common kind, might cause joint issues if it develops over the joints. The hardening of the skin makes it difficult for the joint to use its full range of motion. Generalized plaque morphea is another type of morphea that can affect the joints, as it can penetrate below the skin to affect the muscle and bone. Pansclerotic morphea, which requires the most aggressive treatment, is a rapidly progressing kind of morphea involving multiple plaques. 

Left untreated, it can cover the entire body aside from the hands and feet, which can cause serious joint involvement when the skin hardens over joints. The most common type of morphea in school-age children is linear. With linear morphea, there's just a single band of discolored and thickened skin. It usually runs down a leg or arm, causing mobility issues, though it can sometimes extend down the forehead.

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Katherine MacAulay
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