Advertisement Loading
▾ Continue Below ▾

Guide To Treating And Preventing Broken Blood Vessels On The Face

Broken blood vessels on the face are also commonly known as spider veins. Though spider veins can appear anywhere on the body, they are most common on the face and legs. Individuals tend to experience the most worry about them when they appear on their face, since that is the most visible place for them. Spider veins have many potential causes, including immense changes in pressure inside the skin or outside air, like when an extreme weather system moves through the area. They can also be caused by blunt impacts. Individuals whose family members have them are more likely to develop them.

Patients have several options for broken blood vessel treatment. Examples of treatment for spider veins include prescription topical creams, such as prescription retinoids, and sclerotherapy. Laser therapy for spider veins is also common. Patients may even find success with natural remedies for broken blood vessels on their face. Learn about the best treatments for spider veins and how to prevent broken blood vessels on the face now.

Advertisement Loading
▾ Continue Below ▾

Laser Therapy

EliteDaily
Advertisement Loading
▾ Continue Below ▾

Laser therapy, also known as light therapy, is a non-invasive and non-toxic way of destroying unwanted veins. The treatment uses lasers to focus light on the spider veins. The goal of the laser is to transmit photons, which will then be absorbed by blood cells found within the veins. As the cells absorb more and more photons, they generate enough heat to destroy the surrounding cells of the blood vessel. From there, the damaged vein shrinks in size and will eventually dissolve.

This therapy is considered the top treatment option for broken blood vessels on the face. Although it can be used on other portions of the body, it is rare for laser therapy to be employed on leg veins. The risks from the treatment are minimal with a good dermatologist, but they do exist. Patients may experience swelling, bleeding, discoloration, and pain. More rarely, some can suffer from infection, crusting, or permanent scarring.

NEXT PAGE
Advertisement Loading
▾ Continue Below ▾
NEXT PAGE
Katherine MacAulay
NEXT PAGE
Advertisement Loading
▾ Continue Below ▾
Advertisement Loading
▾ Continue Below ▾

MORE FROM HEALTHPREP

    Advertisement Loading
    ▾ Continue Below ▾
    Advertisement Loading
    ▾ Continue Below ▾
    Advertisement Loading
    ▾ Continue Below ▾
    Advertisement Loading
    ▾ Continue Below ▾
    Advertisement Loading
    ▾ Continue Below ▾