Options For Treating Barrett's Esophagus

Radiofrequency Ablation

Wikipedia
Advertisement Loading
▾ Continue Below ▾

Radiofrequency ablation is a procedure used to ablate diseased or abnormal tissues in the digestive tract with the use of heat energy. Tissue ablation is performed so the abnormal tissue can be destroyed to give the body an opportunity to grow back new healthy tissues in its place. Radiofrequency ablation allows Barrett's esophagus patients to eradicate the abnormal lining of their esophagus. The procedure is carried out with the use of an endoscope similar to the one used in an endoscopic resection. However, the endoscope in radiofrequency ablation has an electrode on the end of it. The electrode is the device that will deliver heat energy directly to the abnormal tissues of the esophageal lining. Once the application of heat is administered to all of the diseased tissues, they will slough off between two and three days following the procedure. It will take the individual around six to eight weeks to regrow normal squamous cell lining in their esophagus. Depending on the extent of Barrett's esophagus, up to three separate radiofrequency ablation treatments may be required to remove all of the diseased tissues in the esophageal lining.

Continue reading to reveal more options for treating Barrett's esophagus now.

BACK
(2 of 6)
NEXT
Advertisement Loading
▾ Continue Below ▾
BACK
(2 of 6)
NEXT
Whitney Alexandra
BACK
(2 of 6)
NEXT
Advertisement Loading
▾ Continue Below ▾
Advertisement Loading
▾ Continue Below ▾

MORE FROM HEALTHPREP

    Advertisement Loading
    ▾ Continue Below ▾
    Advertisement Loading
    ▾ Continue Below ▾
    Advertisement Loading
    ▾ Continue Below ▾
    Advertisement Loading
    ▾ Continue Below ▾