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Methods For Treating And Managing Hip Dysplasia

Hip dysplasia is a condition involving a malformation of the hip joint that results in a higher risk of joint dislocation. The hip is one of the ball-and-socket joints in the body, and the sockets of patients with hip dysplasia don't completely cover the ball. This affects the rotation of the ball in the socket, and the ball isn't able to rotate freely for movement. The ball and socket in the hip joint are composed of the ball of the thigh bone and the socket of the pelvis. This abnormality can cause a multitude of issues because the hips support a lot of body weight, and they're responsible for many everyday movements like sitting and walking. Individuals can be born with hip dysplasia, or it may be caused by swaddling, breech birth, or any condition that reduces the amount of space in the womb during gestation. The symptoms of hip dysplasia can depend on a variety of factors like age. Babies sometimes have one leg shorter than the other, and older children, teenagers, and young adults may limp or experience hip pain. Treatment for hip dysplasia focuses on preserving the hip and reducing pain, and early diagnosis of the condition provides more options for treatment. Get to know the treatment options for hip dysplasia now.

Hip Preserving Surgery

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Livestrong
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Hip preserving surgery can be performed on patients to ease the discomfort and maintain the hip. Individuals who haven't suffered extensive damage to the hip cartilage may be good candidates for this type of surgery. A periacetabular osteotomy is often performed to lessen pain and extend the life of the joint. This surgery changes the position of the hip socket to provide better coverage to the ball of the hip joint and restore normal alignment. Candidates for periacetabular osteotomy can range in age from eleven to about fifty years old. Adolescents typically have faster recovery times, but older patients can benefit from the surgery as well. Patients with arthritis and ongoing cartilage injury are usually not good candidates for this type of operation. The surgery involves cutting around the socket to reorient it, and it's subsequently held in its new position with screws while the bone heals. Additionally, cuts to the thigh bone may be necessary for some patients to further improve hip alignment.

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